Day off 02

A colleague from work switched schedules with me this week so my day off moved from Friday to Thursday. I coordinated with T so I could hitch a ride with her to the city to visit galleries while she met with her former co-workers for lunch. Unfortunately, some galleries were closed for installation but I was able to catch a few that were still running.

© Cathleen Naundorf
Robert Tat Gallery


Nostalgia greeted me when I entered Robert Tat Gallery and saw Cathleen Naundorf's photographs on the wall. It had been a decade or so that I had seen Polaroid work. It was a popular medium for experimentation while I was in school. It was quite refreshing to view them again especially knowing the company has ceased making instant film last year. Surprisingly, the image above entitled An Ordinary Day: Valentino haute couture was done in 2008. The rest were made from 2005-2009.

In 1994, Cathleen met Horst P. Horst and was inspired by his work. She lives and works in Paris photographing for several magazines and for specific projects with various fashion houses.

Polaroid's beauty stems from its imperfections, its unique color palette and the way it subdues light. Cathleen has masterfully incorporated these qualities to her images. I am curious to know how her images will evolve once the Polaroid film supply dries up. Nonetheless, her work is a reminder to me that classic elegance is timeless.


Edward Hopper, Robert Frank and William Eggleston
Curated by: Jeffrey Fraenkel

Photograph: Fraenkel Gallery

T saw the Edward Hopper retrospective two years ago in Washington DC and was taken by his work. I was curious to see what it was that intrigued her. When I heard that Fraenkel Gallery was putting up Edward Hopper and Company, I wanted to see the show especially because his paintings were juxtaposed with the work of contemporary photographers. The image above shows my favorite pairings. They hold equal strength even when they are executed in different mediums. I lingered at this corner for quite sometime studying the subjects' gestures, light and composition. I am probably drawn and inspired by them because of the mood. There is something intriguing when subjects are captured while they are enveloped in their own thoughts.

Umma, 2008; oil, encaustic, reclaimed objects, bones on panel; 14 x 36 inches (triptych)
Sono Osato
Photograph: Brian Gross Fine Arts

It was probably the striking red colored panels that made me stop and walk a few steps back to Brian Gross Fine Art. Somehow, I find an orderliness to the complexity and layering of reclaimed objects in Sono Osato's work. I love her play of positive and negative spaces and the graphic shapes she has chosen to incorporate in her paintings for this exhibition.

Here are excerpts from the press release:

Osato’s work embodies ideas connecting language, archaeology and geology. A combination of encaustic, oil painting, drawing and assemblage, the visual elements create rhythms of movement and texture.

Osato recontextualizes the metal hardware into compositions as though archaeological detritus. Merging and emerging from the real objects, silhouettes of drawn objects vie for space, perfectly integrating and creating a greater depth of surface. The painting has a powerful, physical presence with a vertical rhythm to the elements, revealing layers of the past marching to a hidden order. Osato recontextualizes the metal hardware into compositions as though archaeological detritus. Merging and emerging from the real objects, silhouettes of drawn objects vie for space, perfectly integrating and creating a greater depth of surface. The painting has a powerful, physical presence with a vertical rhythm to the elements, revealing layers of the past marching to a hidden order.